CANADIAN UFO

After a Canadian woman witnesses a UFO landing near her home, a mysterious video tape of the event is sent to investigators.

A UFO spotted in Ontario, Canada

A helicopter mysterious appeared after the sighting

CASE DETAILS

On August 18, 1991, at around 10 PM, Diane Labenek of West Carleton, Ontario, Canada, had just put her children to bed, and her husband was out running an errand, when the dogs began to howl. When Diane investigated, she witnessed a scene that she couldn’t explain:

“I looked out the window and I saw flames out on the field, extremely red flames and lots of smoke. It didn’t look like a fire. I know what a fire looks like when you start a fire out there when the grass is very dry. If you start a fire, you will see it moving either this way, or closer to the woods. And the fire was on one spot only. I saw a ship coming down close to the flames. Right on top of the ship, I saw a blue flashing light and another light was on the bottom, very bright. I didn’t know what to do. I was looking at it for about 10 minutes or so. And then the ship went a little bit back over the trees and it disappeared and I saw all the flames turn out at the same time. I don’t think I’d like to see it again.  It’s very scary. I’ve lived here for many, many years and I have never been so scared in my life.

Diane said it entered her mind to call the police, but she worried what they would think:

“What am I going to tell them? I’m going to tell them I saw flares out there past 10 o’clock at night and there was a ship up there. And they were going to say, ‘Okay Diane, that’s fine, we’re coming over.’  So that’s why I didn’t call.”

A UFO researcher received evidence

According to Diane, ten minutes after the lights blinked out, a helicopter appeared. It flew low to the ground over the field where Diane had seen the unexplained lights. After criss-crossing the area, it passed over Diane’s house and disappeared into the night. The next morning, Diane explored the empty fields around her house, searching for evidence of the previous night’s events:

“I searched everything. There were no marks. There were no spots. There were no matches, there was just nothing. The only person I told was my mom and my husband. It kind of bothered me inside for a long, long time, not to tell anybody. But when I went out on the field and I could not find anything, who is going to believe me that this really happened? So I kept it to myself.”

In February of 1992, six months after Diane’s encounter, a package from Canada arrived at the office of Bob Oechsler, one of the foremost UFO researchers at the time. The package had no return address. Inside were secret military documents, pictures, a map, and a videotape of the incident at West Carleton.  According to Bob Oechsler:

“On the label was the name “Guardian.” And it was accompanied by a fingerprint.  Guardian to me was an enigma, certainly nothing I had heard about in the UFO literature.  So it was a mystery starting from scratch.”

How did “Guardian” know where to film the UFO?

At the time, Oechsler was unaware of Diane’s sighting, but he later discovered that the video accurately showed what she had reported seeing. The tape showed a cluster of brightly burning red flames, similar to flares. To their right hovered a dark, disk-like object emitting a bright glow from its underside. The object was capped by a rapidly strobbing blue light. To Bob Oechsler, the tape looked real:

“I got a sense, initially, that this was a real event occurring in a field as opposed to some prop set up in a room somewhere. I kind of had a sense I might be dealing with something that was potentially authentic here.”

The map that was included in the package directed Oechsler to West Carleton, Ontario.  He went there with UFO researcher Graham Lightfoot. When they interviewed Diane, she described exactly what was in the videotape sent by Guardian:

“She had not seen a tape.  She had no idea what we knew. And yet she was able to describe things that we already knew from the tape.

Dr. Bruce Maccabee, a U.S. Navy physicist and photo analyst, has studied UFOs for years:

“It’s one of the clearest videos I’ve seen that shows a structured object. There’s the beacon light, blue light evidently, reflecting down on the body of the craft, the outline of the object itself.  You can see some sort of dark lines that appear, some brightness structure, indicating something generating light is hanging down below the object. It’s generating green light as well as blue light.”

Dr. Maccabee believes the tape is not a fraud:

“The section of the video which shows the object as sort of appearing over a rise is quite convincing to me as what you would expect if somebody were in the field trying to get closer to it and not knowing how close he could get. And so he turns on his camera while he’s walking. He knows he’s going to come up over a rise and see it and you can see in the video he moves further and further down until you see the whole device. Suddenly, the light coming towards him gets brighter and brighter and you get a great big diffuse reflection or image in the camera, which suggests to me that this object shined a beam, a blue beam right at him.”

Are these government documents a fraud?

Dr. Maccabee estimates the object to be 20 to 30 feet in diameter.  According to Bob Oechsler, that’s too big to be a hoax:

“It appeared to be so large that it would not be logical to try to set all this up at night, under darkness. There would’ve been evidence during the day of movement of generators, of somebody hauling cables, maybe a big apparatus or something that they would’ve had to bring in there for that night. Clearly, if there was a hoax involved, Diane would’ve seen evidence of it in advance.”

Audio analysis of the tape revealed only the distant barking of dogs, probably Diane’s.
The craft itself seemed to be silent. There was no audible trace of power generators which, if the object was staged, would be necessary to run its massive lights.

Dr. Robert Nathan of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory reviewed the tape in a non-official capacity. He could not explain the images or dismiss the tape as a hoax:

After the incident, low-flying helicopters cruised over West Carleton on a regular basis.  The helicopters were black, green, or maroon in color. They were unmarked and had darkly tinted windows. The Canadian military denies any involvement. Where the helicopters came from and what they were searching for remains a mystery. According to Maj. N.J. Patterson of the Canadian Forces:

“The helicopters that are used in this area of Canada do not fly low in that area. There are no requirements for our military helicopters to go and fly near private citizen’s property like that.”

Bob Oechsler says the key to the entire incident lies with the person using the name Guardian:

“I think Guardian has to be connected to the event in some way. I don’t see any way Guardian could’ve just happened on to this. I don’t see Guardian as a UFO investigator.  Guardian is much more involved in this than the evidence even suggests, in my opinion.”

But supposed military documents that arrived with the videotape raise serious questions about Guardian’s credibility. The papers allege far-reaching conspiracies involving UFOs, Red China, and nuclear weapons. Bob Oechsler was skeptical:

“There’s some question, immediately, with regard to the authenticity of the documentation, that it didn’t look like it was a typical government document.”

Maj. Patterson reviewed one of the documents:

“This document is clearly a fabrication. There are way too many errors in the document to make it authentic. Someone with very little effort could have come a lot closer than this.”

Included on the videotape are images which Guardian claimed show an alien being. Again, Bob Oechsler wasn’t convinced:

“Clearly, this could’ve have been someone dressed up in a costume. But that posed a major question:  if, in fact, the video images of the disk were authentic, why would anyone contaminate such an extraordinary event with fake images of alien creatures?”

Although the video arrived with questionable material, many experts believe that the event shown on the tape did indeed take place. But was it a staged event or an actual craft of some sort? Bob Oechsler says that only one person can answer that question:

“This is either an extraordinary top secret flying vehicle of somebody’s government or it is of a non-human origin. Having no contact with Guardian is probably the biggest frustration to an investigation like this. We don’t know who Guardian is, what Guardian represents. We don’t know if Guardian was sent or went on his own. We have no idea what the solution to many of these mysteries are going to be. We may never know.”

Angel Hair

spiderhair

Angel hair or siliceous cotton is a sticky, fibrous substance reported in connection with UFO sightings, or manifestations of the Virgin Mary. It has been described as being like a cobweb or a jelly.

It is named for its similarity to fine hair, or spider webs, and in some cases the substance has been found to be the web threads of migrating spiders. Reports of angel hair say that it disintegrates or evaporates within a short time of forming. Angel hair is an important aspect of the UFO religion Raëlism, and one theory among ufologists is that it is created from “ionized air sleeting off an electromagnetic field” that surrounds a UFO.

Sightings

There have been many reports of falls of angel hair around the world. Angel hair was reported during the 1561 celestial phenomenon over Nuremberg and also at the Miracle at Fatima on the 13th of September and October 1917.

The most widely reported incidence occurred in Oloron, France in 1952, when “great flakes” were reported as falling from a nearly cloudless sky. On October 27, 1954, Gennaro Lucetti and Pietro Lastrucci reported standing on the balcony of a hotel in St. Mark’s Square in Venice and seeing two “shining spindles” flying across the sky leaving a trail of the angel hair.

In New Zealand and Australia local newspapers have reported many sightings since the 1950s, although many have been identified as spider webs after analysis. An incident was reported in Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka on October 20, 2014.

Published explanations

Explanations based on known phenomena include:

  • Some types of spiders are known to migrate through the air, sometimes in large numbers, on cobweb gliders. Many cases of angel hair were found to be these spider threads and, in one occasion, small spiders have been found on the material.Linyphiidae spiders frequently cause showers of gossamer threads in England and the Northern hemisphere. Australia and New Zealand have frequent cases, caused by several native species of spiders and by some introduced species of Linyphiidae.
  • In the Portuguese city of Évora on November 2, 1959, a substance described as angel hair was collected and analyzed under a microscope by a local school director and later by armed forces technicians and scientists of the University of Lisbon. The scientists concluded that the angel hair was produced by a small insect or some kind of single-celled organism.
  • Atmospheric electricity may cause floating dust particles to become polarized, and attraction between these polarized dust particles may cause them to join together, to form long filaments.
  • On two occasions a sample was sent for testing once on October 13, 1917 a sample found at Cova da Iria was sent to Lisbon and on October 17, 1957 another sample found at Cova da Iria and examined. The analysis of this proved to be natural consisting of white flakes. When put under a microscope it was found to be a vegetable product not animal.

Unscientific explanations based on beliefs regarding Unidentified Flying Objects include:

  • Ionized air may be sleeting off the electromagnetic field that surrounds a UFO.
  • Excess energy converted into matter.
  • The usage by UFOs of a G-field would cause heavy atoms in ordinary air to react among themselves and produce a kind of precipitate that falls to the ground and disappears as the ionization decreases.

Supernatural Staffordshire: the phantom Victorian schoolboy spotted on a railway line

Each week our supernatural expert reveals haunting tales from across the county.

More and more people are contacting me to talk about their own supernatural experiences – Id like to think the tide has turned and discussing the paranormal is less taboo than it used to be.

I would encourage everyone to do a simple experiment. Ask just five friends, in private, if they believe in the paranormal and have they had a paranormal experience.

Thirty-four per cent of the UK population believe in ghosts – that’s a huge 10 per cent more than believe in god.

So why is there still a stigma about people who openly profess to believe? Perhaps it’s to do with peer pressure, society and the media among other factors.

Just recently I was having a drink with a friend and the topic of the paranormal came up.

He doesn’t believe, categorically. However, we ended up chatting for a number of hours over various “what ifs” and found some surprising common ground once the initial barriers of conventional understanding had dropped.

“I would rather a mind opened by wonder, than one closed by belief,” is possibly my favourite saying, because it’s true.

Believe in it or not, the paranormal is a fascinating subject.

The diversity of experiences and depths of emotion it put us through run the full spectrum – from enlightening to absolute terror.

In 1989 Gareth was 19 and living at Barlaston.

Growing up he would spend lots of time walking around this beautiful area, surrounded by open fields and picturesque streams.

“It was an amazing time in my life” Gareth, now 47, said. “Me and my friend would go for long walks, all around Cocknage and Barlaston.

“We would roam through the fields, around the large lake at Barlaston and sit on Barlaston train platform before they fenced it all off – it was a magical time.”

One evening in July Gareth and one of his friends made their way down to Wedgwood Lake and then past the cricket club, finally coming to the white train crossing building and to there destination of the railway station.

“We used to get some sweets and drinks and sit talking about crazy things that you think about at that age, ghosts and UFOs were a big favourite of ours. We had some amazing conversations,” Gareth recalled.

Darkness had begun to fall, the station platform was still, not even the slightest breeze was blowing as some litter and a few leaves sat motionless on the black and white painted wooden platform. A rabbit ran across the empty tracks in the distance.

“That’s when we saw him, a small boy about 10-years-old who ran across the track right in front of our eyes.” Gareth told me.

“He came out of nowhere. One second he was running across the track, the next he had gone. But for the short amount of time we could see him he looked solid – like a real boy.”

Gareth described the boy as wearing old-fashioned Victorian clothing including a flat cap.

“We both saw him as clear as day and when he disappeared we both nearly jumped out of our skin,” he said.

Both boys got up immediately and ran from the station back towards Wedgwood Lake.

“I’ve seen my friend from that night recently at a reunion and he still remembers it just as I did, although he has never mentioned it to anyone as he thinks people will mock him”

Many more people will experience ghosts and other paranormal events tonight just as Gareth did that night back in 1989.

Why do so many royals drive Audis? Could it be because of the 60% discount?

The Royal family are understood to be benefiting from a leasing arrangement by German car manufacturer Audi which could offer them up to a 60 per cent discount on their cars.

As valued customers, the Royals are able to take advantage of the company’s VIP terms and conditions – meaning their cars are also personally delivered.

Such favourable leasing arrangements are not available to ordinary motorists and shows why the Royals have favoured the manufacturer over the last decade.

This Audi A6 being driver by Charles, with wife Camilla, is one of a number of models the Royals have leased with up to a 60% discount

This Audi A6 being driver by Charles, with wife Camilla, is one of a number of models the Royals have leased with up to a 60% discount

The Prince of Wales owns several models, including an A8 limousine that cost £92,500 and a pair of Allroad estate for personal use by himself and the Duchess of Cornwall.

He has also purchased two A4’s for his staff.

Prince William drives a S4 saloon which has a 4.2 litre engine while his fiancee Kate Middleton owns a silver A3 model. Prince Harry also owns a diesel A3.

The deal with the company may also explain why its head of PR Jon Zamett has been invited to Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding at the end of the month.

The manufacturer is understood to be investing thousands of pounds in boosting its image – and getting close to the Royals.

They have made large donations to charities that are supported by the Princes and signed an agreement in 2005 to sponsor the English polo squad.

Princes William and Harry have a chat as they get into William's 4.2 litre S4 saloon

Princes William and Harry have a chat as they get into William’s 4.2 litre S4 saloon

Kate Middleton and a friend watch a polo match as an Audi 4x4 sits on top of the hill. Miss Middleton has previously bought an A3 model

Kate Middleton and a friend watch a polo match as an Audi 4×4 sits on top of the hill. Miss Middleton has previously bought an A3 model

Marketing experts say that offering their cars at competitive rates could offer unique prestige.

Ian Stephens, of Saffron Brand Consultants, told the Times: ‘Giving away cars is a bit sensitive.

‘If you rent them at a discount you get around concerns over bribery or corruptions and still gain the association.’

‘Audi are competing against other German and luxury brands that are established in the UK market, and they’ve always been outsiders. They are trying to buy their way into the establishment.’

Audi has recruited stars such as singer Justin Timberlake to boost its brand and advertise its A1 model

Audi has recruited stars such as singer Justin Timberlake to boost its brand and advertise its A1 model

Royals are not the only targets of Audi’s campaign.

In a document shown to the Times newspaper, the carmaker is specifically targeting individuals for discounts who ‘will directly impact the brand image’.

This has included sports figures, politicians and celebrities.

Recently, singer Justin Timberlake has fronted adverts for the A1 model while former cricketer Andrew ‘Freddie’ Flintoff’ has become a company ambassador in the Middle East.

A spokesman for the company said: ‘We provide VIPs with a service when it is inconvenient for them to go to a dealer.’

‘We have fleet buyers who will buy more than one car – it’s appropriate for them to have a discount.’

The spokesman would not comment on specific cases involving the Royals.

A Clarence House spokesman added that ‘of course’ Prince Charles paid for his cars but would not discuss any terms.

 

Avebury Stone Circle

Today i Visited the stone circle in Avebury which is something i wanted to do for a long time. To my surprise on touching one of the stones i got a slight electric shock something which has been reported before due to the energy the stones emit.

The circles are much bigger than they appear in pictures and i was also surprised to see how many of the stones were missing and had markers in there place.