Kecksburg UFO incident

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The Kecksburg UFO incident occurred on December 9, 1965, at Kecksburg, Pennsylvania, United States. A large, brilliant fireball was seen by thousands in at least six U.S. states and Ontario, Canada. It streaked over the Detroit, Michigan – Windsor, Canada area, reportedly dropped hot metal debris over Michigan and northern Ohio, starting some grass fires, and caused sonic booms in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. It was generally assumed and reported by the press to be a meteor after authorities discounted other proposed explanations such as a plane crash, errant missile test, or reentering satellite debris. However, eyewitnesses in the small village of Kecksburg, about 30 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, claimed something crashed in the woods. A boy said he saw the object land; his mother saw a wisp of blue smoke arising from the woods and alerted authorities. Another reported feeling a vibration and “a thump” about the time the object reportedly landed. Others from Kecksburg, including local volunteer fire department members, reported finding an object in the shape of an acorn and about as large as a Volkswagen Beetle. Writing resembling Egyptian hieroglyphs was also said to be in a band around the base of the object. Witnesses further reported that intense military presence, most notably the United States Army, secured the area, ordered civilians out, and then removed an object on a flatbed truck. The military claimed they searched the woods and found “absolutely nothing.”

The Tribune-Review from nearby Greensburg which had a reporter at the scene ran an article the next morning, “Unidentified Flying Object Falls near Kecksburg—Army Ropes off Area”. The article continued, “The area where the object landed was immediately sealed off on the order of U.S. Army and State Police officials, reportedly in anticipation of a ‘close inspection’ of whatever may have fallen … State Police officials there ordered the area roped off to await the expected arrival of both U.S. Army engineers and possibly, civilian scientists.” However, a later edition of the newspaper stated that nothing had been found after authorities searched the area.

The official explanation of the widely seen fireball was that it was a mid-sized meteor. However speculation as to the identity of the Kecksburg object (if there was one—reports vary) range from alien craft to debris from Kosmos 96, a Soviet space probe intended for Venus but which failed and never left the Earth’s atmosphere.

Similarities have been drawn between the Kecksburg incident and the Roswell UFO incident, leading to the former being referred to as “Pennsylvania’s Roswell.”

West Freugh Ufo Incident!

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In April 1957, while monitoring a test bombing exercise, radar units of the Ministry of Supply Bombing Trials Unit headquartered at RAF West Freugh observed the UK’s most reported UFO incident.

Awaiting a test over Luce Bay from an aircraft RAE Farnborough, the civilian radar operators of the Ministry of Supply were told to turn their sets off due to a delay.

One unit at Balscalloch near Corsewall Point did not receive the signal. They observed a large and solid unidentified echo, an almost stationary object, located above the Irish Sea. It remained stationary for 10 minutes at an initial height of 50,000 feet (15,000 m), 20 to 25 miles (40 km) north of Stranraer; its height then increased to 70,000 feet (21,000 m). The Balscalloch Unit contacted West Freugh air traffic control and informed the controller that there were now several moving targets. These were moving at speeds of thousands of miles per hour, and the echoes were like nothing the radar operator had ever seen before.

West Freugh observed the targets, as did the now switched-on Ardwell Unit (14 miles to their south), confirming the observation. After ten minutes, the position begun to move north-east at speeds gradually increasing up to 70 mph (110 km/h), and at a height of 54,000 feet (16,000 m). A third radar station then confirmed the target, and noted that after the radar echo had travelled about 20 miles (32 km), it did an “impossible” sharp turn and proceeded in a south-easterly direction whilst increasing its speed. The third station then tracked four objects at 14,000 feet (4,300 m) altitude and 4000 yards line astern from each other, which was confirmed by Balscalloch. The radar operators noted the echoes were much larger than those of normal planes, size being nearer to that of a ship.

RAF intelligence ordered radar stations throughout the UK to be on 24-hour alert. A few days later, civilian operators reported the incident to various newspapers including the Sunday Dispatch, which published the incident on 7 April 1957. An Air Ministry spokesman declined to make a detailed statement until a full report had been studied by experts, while Wing Commander Walter Whitworth, RAF West Freugh Commanding Officer, made an Air Ministry approved statement.

“I have been ordered by the Air Ministry to say nothing about the object. I am not allowed to reveal its position, course and speed. From the moment of picking it up, it was well within our area. It was an object of some substance – quite definitely not a freak. No mistake could have been made by the [Ministry of Supply] civilians operating the sets. They are fully qualified and experienced officers.”

Questions were asked in Parliament and the Air Ministry were eventually obliged to admit they were unable to explain the incident. As the incident had leaked to the press, internal RAF records were well preserved, although details of official records are protected by the Official Secrets Act However, in an RAF meeting minutes document of 1970, Whitworth additionally commented that:

“After remaining stationary for a short time, the UFO began to rise vertically with no forward movement, rising rapidly to approximately 60,000 feet (18,000 m) in much less than a minute. The UFO then began to move in an easterly direction, slowly at first but later accelerating very fast and traveling towards Newton Stewart, losing height on the way. Suddenly the UFO turned to the southeast, picking up speed to 240 mph (390 km/h) as it moved towards the Isle of Man. It was at this stage that the radar signals became contradictory. Balscalloch tracked a single ‘object’ at high altitude while Ardwell picked up what appeared to be four separate objects moving line astern behind each other at a height of 14,000 feet (4,300 m). As the echoes disappeared; all three radars fleetingly traced the four smaller UFOs ‘trailing’ behind the larger object. The UFO had been tracked for 36 minutes.”

The station was also used, during the Summer of 1957, to house airmen deployed on Operation Hardrock, which was the name given to establishing a rocket tracking station on the island of Hirta in the St Kilda archipelago. Airmen were driven daily to Cairnryan Military Port and those, destined for St.Kilda, were shipped out on Mk VIII LST’s (landing ship tank).

Ley line Time slips or a Ufo abduction?

 

Ley lines /l lnz/ are apparent alignments of land forms, places of ancient religious significance or culture, often including man-made structures. They are ancient, straight ‘paths’ or routes in the landscape which are believed to have spiritual significance.

The phrase was coined in 1921 by the amateur archaeologist Alfred Watkins, referring to supposed alignments of numerous places of geographical and historical interest, such as ancient monuments and megaliths, natural ridge-tops and water-fords. In his books Early British Trackways and The Old Straight Track, he sought to identify ancient trackways in the British landscape. Watkins later developed theories that these alignments were created for ease of overland trekking by line-of-sight navigation during neolithic times, and had persisted in the landscape over millennia.  In his book The View Over Atlantis (1969), the writer John Michell revived the term “ley lines”, associating it with spiritual and mystical theories about alignments of land forms, drawing on the Chinese concept of feng shui. He believed that a mystical network of ley lines existed across Britain,  a notion actively promoted by “The Ley Hunter” magazine, edited at the time by his biographer, Paul Screeton.

Since the publication of Michell’s book, the spiritualised version of the concept has been adopted by other authors and applied to landscapes in many places around the world.

The ley line hypothesis is a type of pseudoscience. A random distribution of a sufficient number of points on a plane will inevitably create alignments of random points purely by chance.

Time slips or a Ufo abduction?
Time slips maybe associated with the ley. Two military personnel from Salisbury Plain whilst parked close to the ley decided to take time out to have a cigarette before returning to their military camp. Suddenly, they noted a strange orange coloured light which appeared from nowhere. As trained observers, they were curious about the light that seemingly dashed from one side of the car to the other. The light then disappeared and the night retuned to normal. They decided to return to base and instantly realised something was hopelessly wrong as they were met by the Military Police. They had been absent without leave for 2 days! Yet they had just smoked a single cigarette! Something had happened, was it a time slip or an abduction? Whatever the truth is, the event took the two soldiers from an ordinary night into an extraordinary unexplained experience.

The Rollright Stones

 

2nd August 2017

Made a trip to rollright stones in Oxfordshire UK after researching them online and reading articles which claimed people come in trances or higher awareness at the stones, i personally experienced none of these sensations but my main reason for visiting was the connection throughout history of lights in the sky and ufo’s with stone circles.

The Rollright Stones is a complex of three Neolithic and Bronze Age megalithic monuments near the village of Long Compton, on the borders of Oxfordshire and Warwickshire.

Roswellians report ET abductions

roswell-mapHaving left their mark on the city nearly 70 years ago, nefarious aliens may still be visiting Roswell and it isn’t to see the famed UFO museum.

A collection of reports from MUFON reveals that both residents and visitors to the historic UFO hotspot believe that aliens abducted them while they were there.

One experiencer told the group that, in 2015, a co-worker was taken for two hours and returned with some kind of implant in his head.

Another report from a year earlier concerned a parent who said their son had seen two gray aliens and now was plagued by nightmares of being abducted.

And an amazingly detailed account of a 1969 encounter tells the story of how a family was driving to Roswell, spotted a UFO, panicked, and somehow had over three hours of ‘missing time.’

Considering the ugly incident which indelibly connected aliens to the city, it is a bit surprising to hear that some ETs have allegedly been returning to Roswell.

Presumably, the entities behind the infamous UFO crash would want to steer clear of Roswell out of either embarrassment or fear of being seen by alien enthusiasts.

Then again, perhaps the visitors are nostalgic aliens who see the city as a tourist destination for their species, much like it is for ours.

While the city would no doubt welcome them, we’re guessing that they would prefer the aliens stick to the museum gift shop rather than taking home any humans.